transformational_ecology_reports

Climate, Mind and Behavior Reports

CBBReport 2013-400Deepening Feedback Loops: Using real life lessons learned to improve outcomes. 2013 Climate, Buildings and Behavior Symposium Synthesis Report. In September 2013 the Garrison Institute convened over 60 real estate professionals including for-profit and not-for-profit firms, building industry experts, and social science researchers to explore successful approaches for enhancing sustainable practices, reducing energy consumption, and lowering the cost of operations in multifamily residential and commercial buildings. The theme of the symposium was ‘deepening feedback loops’ with a goal of using real life lessons learned to improve outcomes. This report is the distillation of the learning that took place over the three-day meeting. Americans spend the vast majority of their lives indoors— that is, in buildings. People working in the building and real estate industries play a critical role in determining the quality of those indoor environments. There is a real opportunity to make huge strides in health, wellbeing and environmental impact by engaging in this work in ways that enhance building performance.  icon Deepening Feedback Loops: 2013 Climate, Buildings and Behavior Symposium Synthesis Report

CMB Report 2013Variation and Diversity in Sustainability and Climate Work: 2013 Climate, Mind and Behavior Symposium Synthesis Report.  In June 2013 the Garrison Institute convened over 100 environmental nonprofit leaders and academic and independent researchers to consider ways of enhancing the effectiveness of efforts to engage with individuals, organizations, communities, businesses and policymakers. This report focuses on the knowledge that there is no one feasible ‘fix’ to the challenges posed by climate change; rather there are many ways of mitigating and adapting. Working on climate change from the social and behavioral facet means we are working towards wellbeing for all in a brighter, healthier and more fulfilling future, through existing social networks, finding and partnering with unlikely allies and ultimately by shifting broader cultural norms. Working towards a future marked by wellbeing means working towards a low carbon, less energy intensive future where fortified social networks enable the kinds of resilience that will be necessary to better weather extreme climate events. icon Variation and Diversity in Sustainability and Climate Work: 2013 Climate, Mind and Behavior Synthesis Report

TCCB Report 2013he Human Dimensions of Resilient and Sustainable Cities: 2013 Climate, Cities and Behavior Symposium Synthesis Report. In March 2013 the Garrison Institute convened 100 city sustainability officers, researchers and others working on climate change and sustainability in communities across the country. The goal of this symposium was to ‘explore strategies for working with people, organizations and social networks to forestall crises and enhance the ability of cities to bounce back from crises.’ This report is the distillation of the learning that took place over the three-day meeting. icon The Human Dimensions of Resilient and Sustainable Cities: 2013 Climate, Cities and Behavior Synthesis Report

Behavior Wedge Profile Model Development Report. A growing body of research has inspired urban sustainability directors around the country to address the human dimensions of energy and carbon as part of a comprehensive approach to address city-level sustainability challenges. Despite mounting interest, however, these efforts have been thwarted by the lack of affordable, city-level assessments of behavior-based savings opportunities. While city-specific survey-based approaches do offer a means of collecting much needed information about existing conditions and practices, they are often expensive and time-consuming to implement. On the other hand, the existing set of national-level assessments provide an affordable alternative source of data but lack the ability to account for important sources of regional and city-level variation whether in climate conditions, building stock, technology saturation, technology use practices, attitudes or other factors that influence how energy is used locally and which types of behaviors are likely to yield the most promising savings. This report documents a third alternative that provides a low-cost means for developing city-specific assessments of behavior-based energy and carbon reduction opportunities. The product of this approach is a city-specific Behavior Wedge Profile that highlights local opportunities and targets that can guide behavior-based strategies. icon Behavior Wedge Profile Model Development Report 2013 (916.88 kB)

Behavior Wedge Profile Description. Behavior Wedge Profile Assessments can be provided in a relatively inexpensive manner through the use of existing data sources and through a collective, one-time investment in the development of the underlying model. The use of existing data sources from the Energy Information Administration, the U.S. Bureau of the Census (among other sources) eliminates the need for developing, fielding and analyzing unique, city-specific surveys as a means of data collection and assessment. While the full development of the estimation model for all seven sectors is likely to be expensive, it represents a one-time investment with potential application in an unlimited number of cities. The Garrison Institute is working with a set of USDN member cities to develop and refine the Behavior Wedge Assessment Model and Profile Reports to assess behavioral opportunities for reducing energy consumption and carbon emissions in the residential and commercial building sectors. For more information, please email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . icon Behavior Wedge Profile Description (4.18 MB)

Comprehensive Report on the 2012 Climate, Mind and Behavior Initiative. The Garrison Institute’s Climate, Mind and Behavior Initiative seeks to increase the prevalence of environmentally sustainable lifestyles, decisions, and practices among individuals, organizations, businesses and government entities across the US. In 2012, the Climate, Mind and Behavior Initiative began work on two innovative research projects, held two high-level symposia, and expanded its network of regional hubs and hub activities. The following is a summary of the principal research efforts initiated in 2012, a consolidation of symposium insights for each of the two symposia, and highlights of the hub activities. icon Garrison Institute CMB 2012 Report (3.69 MB)

Comprehensive Report on the 2011 Climate, Mind and Behavior Symposia, March-May 2011. While human behavior has often been identified as a cause of environmental stresses, it is much less frequently identified as a source of solutions. The Garrison Institute’s Climate Mind and Behavior (CMB) Program connects new insights from social and behavioral sciences about the drivers of human behavior with new thinking on solutions to climate change and other environmental issues. In 2011 the Garrison Institute held three high-level symposia for each of the three projects that make up CMB, including “Climate, Mind and Behavior,” exploring and applying social, behavioral, and cognitive science principles to environmental policies and programs; “Climate, Cities and Behavior,” developing effective, low-cost, people-centered strategies for achieving more sustainable resource use practices; and “Climate, Buildings and Behavior,” developing and implementing climate friendly in multifamily residential and commercial buildings. This report is a summary of key content from these three meetings. icon Garrison Institute CMB 2011 Report (4.06 MB)

The Social Brainand the Diffusion of Pro-Social Behavior is a background paper by John Gowdy for the Garrison Institute's Climate, Mind and Behavior Program, January 2011. "As society considers how to motivate humans to address the challenges of climate change, increasing attention is turning to biological insights into human behavior, an inquiry that is starting to supplant the economic paradigm of the 'rational actor' (a model individual who instinctively profit maximizes and optimizes behavior)..." icon John Gowdy: The Social Brain and the Diffusion of Pro-Social Behavior (559.87 kB)

View the print version online

Behavioral Economics, Neuroeconomics, and Climate Change Policy Baseline Review is a background paper by John Gowdy for the Garrison Institute’s Climate, Mind and Behavior Program, March 2010. "It has been suggested that public acceptance of the aggressive policies needed to mitigate the most serious damages from further climate change could be enhanced by a better understanding of the mental models people use to evaluate long term risks..." icon Behavioral Economics, Neuroeconomics, and Climate Change Baseline Review March 2010 (307.2 kB)

View the print version online

Report on the Climate, Mind and Behavior Project, March 2010. "The Garrison Institute's Climate, Mind and Behavior (CMB) Project, part of our Climate Change Leadership Series, integrates recent findings from the behavioral and social sciences, evolutionary theory and psychology about what drives human behavior, with new thinking about climate solutions. Over the last two years CMB has gone from conception to leadership in this important emerging field."icon Report on the Climate, Mind and Behavior Project, March 2010 (902.81 kB)

Real Estate Leadership in the Age of Climate Change, August 2009. "Buildings are responsible for 42% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, so real estate is a key sector through which to address climate change. In May 2009, the Garrison Institute held a three-day retreat for a group of thirty leaders of large and small companies in the real estate sector, leaders of not-for-profit community-based real estate organizations and rising young leaders, to discuss the real estate sector’s response to climate change." icon Real Estate Leadership Comprehensive Report, Aug '09 (235.41 kB)

 

Transformational Ecology Reports

Hudson River Project Comprehensive Report, September 2007. “The Hudson River Project… works with faith leaders to generate values-based conversation on environmental concerns, to catalyze “greening” of houses of worship and to encourage the use of spiritual teachings and contemplative wisdom in support of the social and behavioral changes needed to produce a healthier environment….” icon Hudson River Project Comprehensive Report (531.13 kB)

 

Climate, Mind and Behavior Events

Climate, Mind and Behavior Leadership

Director:

John McIlwain | Bio |

Climate, Mind and Behavior Leadership Council:

Dina Biscotti, UC Davis
Uwe Brandes, Urban Land Institute
Marilyn Cornelius, Stanford University
Jeff Domanski, Princeton University
Becky Ford, University of Otago, New Zealand
Ruth Greenspan-Bell, Woodrow Wilson Intl Center for Scholars
Lauren Kubiak, Natural Resources Defense Council
Skip Laitner, ACEEE
Nils Moe, Urban Sustainability Directors Network
Phil Payne, Gingko Residential
Roger Platt, USGBC
Jonathan Rose, Garrison Institute Board Member
Kurt Roth, Fraunhofer Institute
Jonathan Rowson, RSA
Rachael Shwom, Rutgers University
Jennifer Tabanico, Action Research
Jason Twill, Lend Lease (Australia)

For more information on Climate, Mind and Behavior and Climate, Buildings and Behavior, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.